Mixing Rap Vocals 2: Snoop Teaser

Transcript:

So that’s practical uses for multiband compression, let’s start looking at creative use it. One really cool way to use multiband compression, which I think is like totally out of this world and what real mixing is about: You can use multiband compression to make, in this particular example, to make Snoop Dogg’s vocal Snoopier.

There are tonal properties of everyone’s voice that identify their voice as theirs. And certain tonal properties if they’re pronounced, really bring out that character. Snoop has a certain front of face nose sound to his voice that makes him unquestionably and easily identifiably Snoop Dogg.

We’re gonna find that frequency band. I’m gonna turn off the analyzer for this.

[snoop rap vocal + FabFilter Pro-MB multiband compressor plugin]

Here’s the give away. If you heard only that frequency band, you would still think that kind of sounds like Snoop Dogg. That’s the give away. So another words, this band here.

[vocal + solo frequency band]

You could guess that that’s maybe Snoop Dogg, but this band here, that’s Snoop Dogg. Let’s narrow that up a little bit.

[rap vocal playback]

That tone can become very honky and annoying if it’s too pronounced in a mix. So just by boosting it up we might end up losing something. If I turn the range here to zero and just do a boost, let’s hear how that sounds.

[rap vocal]

It doesn’t sound bad, but it sounds a little forced. It sounds a little disproportionate to how a natural voice might sound. So let’s use some compression to sort of keep it in check.

Learn more in the new Mixing Rap Vocals 2: Advanced Techniques tutorial.

Matthew Weiss

Matthew Weiss

Matthew Weiss is a Grammy nominated and Spellemann Award winning audio engineer from Philadelphia. Matthew has mixed songs for Snoop, Sonny Digital, Gorilla Zoe, Uri Caine, Dizzee Rascal, Arrested Development, 9th Wonder, !llmind & more. Get in touch: Weiss-Sound.com.
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