How to Get a Huge Rock Snare Drum Sound with Layered Drum Samples

What’s up guys? Welcome to a new video. This one, I’m going to show you how to get a big snare sound, like a big rock snare sound using samples from I Want That Sound. We’re also going to use Trigger.

I’ve got a pop rock, country kind of thing here. I get a lot of questions about how I get my drum sounds, so I’m just going to show you by combining samples from different packs, and then a little processing afterwards, not a ton.

But yeah, let me play the track and then we’ll get into the drum samples. So here we go.

[mix]

Alright, cool, so that’s the tune. Big rock thing.

Let me play the drums. Solo them here.

[drums]

Alright. Using Trigger 2 and I’ve got four samples in here from two different packs.

Two are from the Paul Mabury pack and two are from the Ben Phillips pack. So it’s really easy, this is going to be quick.

So I have this fat — let me turn off the glue.

[snare]

Cool. So I have this fat favorite from Ben Phillips kit, which sounds really great, which kind of gives me the overall body. I have this King Ring sample which is ring.

I’ll mute it in the end, but to me, it kind of gives a little front to back space in the room. Then these two Billy Jean samples on the right are from the Paul Mabury pack.

[snares]

That’s sort of the direct snare sample.

[snare room]

Then these big wide rooms that are blended in. You’ll notice the fader is down like, seven and a half dB.

You always want to check the phase when you’re stacking samples, whether it be kick drums or snare drums, or toms, or stomps, or whatever. I check the snare against the overheads, and I just kind of flip it and look for bottom end. Whatever sounds fuller.

So I have the phase flipped on the fat favorite natural and the Billy Jeans, and the Billy Jeans room. I left the King Ring how it was. So if I mute the ring, I’m going to mute it, flip it in and out so you can hear the difference.
To me, it just gets kind flat without it.

[snare, with and without ring]

Still sounds good…

[snare, with and without ring]

But it just loses a little dimension.

The rooms, you can hear these.

[room mics]

You can hear that does quite a bit to the sound of the drum.

So it’s really not that hard, it’s sort of like one sample for space, one for crack, one for body, and then one for ring. Then just checking the phase and blending them to your tastes and to the tune. It sounds really great.

I have a little bit of EQ after it, which is just knocking out a little bit of 160 in the mids, and then a little bit of top end, and then after it, I do have a compressor, which is helping bring up the rooms, but I can’t show you that, because the plug-in is not out yet, and it’s super awesome.

Everybody is going to love it, but soon though. Next week I’ve got a video coming. Everybody is going to go buy this thing.

Anyways, that’s really it. Let me play the kit for you again so you can get an idea.

[drums]

Here’s with the track.

[mix]

Yeah. I mean, this whole kit I think is pretty much replaced with Trigger.

The toms are also from the Ben Phillips kit, and so is the kick. The kick I believe is the everyday natural with the phase flipped, and then the toms are rack and floor. Everyday rack, again, it’s just a great sounding kit. They worked well with the overheads and rooms I was given.

So yeah, check this stuff out. It’s really easy to make great, pro sounding drum tracks these days. That’s all I’ve got. I’ll see you in the next video.

Leave me any questions. Also down below, I’ll include links where you can buy all of this stuff. It’s really affordable. You should definitely check it out, and yeah. That’s all I’ve got! I’ll see you guys in the next video. Later.

Mixnotes

Mixnotes

Mixnotes is a YouTube channel with tutorials on mixing, recording, business, plugins and more. We've partnered with them to feature some of their videos on The Pro Audio Files.
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