Introducing: Advanced Mixing

Hey guys, Matthew Weiss. I am atop the Mesa Verde Cliff Dwellings. I’m on my way from Boston to Los Angeles. Figured that I would stop and tell you about my newest tutorial, which is Advanced Mixing.

Now, I’ve seen the word “advanced” thrown around for tutorials online before, and I think that the use of the word has been a little bit liberal. It usually comes down to stuff like parallel compression techniques and things like that, which are all well and good, but not necessarily especially advanced.

When I say advanced, what this means is that it assumes that you have a really good foundation in mixing to begin with. You recognize all of the terminology, certain things are just second nature to you at this point already, and the basic premise behind this tutorial, what I really wanted to do was make a tutorial that people who have as much experience as myself or even more experience, could still get really great information and learn a lot from it.

So what are the advanced things that I’m teaching? Well, a lot of it is nuanced decision making, because really, a lot of the mixing process is not anything that’s all that technically challenging, it’s really just boiling down to really solid decision making. So I’m framing a lot of the nuanced decision making, why we might use one technique versus another technique, how those things relate to the ultimate goal of the song, how those things relate to the cultural context of the genre… That’s throughout the whole tutorial.

The other side of the tutorial is the technical side of it, which is focused very heavily on techniques. Things that, you know, may be very practical at times, and other things that are a little bit more specific to certain situations.

So for example, I start the tutorial off working on an acoustic guitar which was captured with a mid/side capture, and then it goes through how to balance and structure the image around the mid/side, because there were some mistakes in the capture, and I had to fix them.

So nuanced things like that. It also covers topics like MIDI mapping, in case you want to reinforce an element using a synth or something like that. It talks about drum layering and how to get different augmentations of drums to work together, and in a context where it makes sense, where if you’re using a whole drum kit, for example, but want to augment the kick and the snare, how you’d go about choosing which kicks and which snares, where to look in case you happen to have a humongous drum library, as many of us do.

And this goes on throughout the entire tutorial. Situations where you might only have a DI for a bass, but you want an amp style sound, how to get that sound, and it’s not necessarily as easy as using a reamping technique, or using an amp emulation. There are other ways of doing it.

So I wanted to go through and really take you on the best way to optimize every moment of a mix, even if it means going into some very complex type of stuff.

So it’s a really great tutorial, I’m really excited about it. It’s one where I feel like whether you have three years of experience, four years of experience, or thirty years of experience, you’re going to get a ton of information, and I think it’s going to be something that you can keep coming back to and referring back to as you continue to mix records, and finding new stuff to dig out of it.

The tutorial can be found at, and of course if you want free articles and tutorials and content, you can find that at

Alright guys, until next time.

Matthew Weiss

Matthew Weiss

Matthew Weiss is a Grammy nominated and Spellemann Award winning audio engineer from Philadelphia. Matthew has mixed songs for Snoop, Sonny Digital, Gorilla Zoe, Uri Caine, Dizzee Rascal, Arrested Development, 9th Wonder, !llmind & more. Get in touch:
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